cfa Academy

Christian education at every level


High School Administrators

Director of Student & Faculty Affairs – Dave Calvert

Director of Guidance & Academic Affairs – Karissa Thorpe

Director of Athletics & Character Development – Dave Murr



Bible

Introduction to Christianity and Biblical Finance

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This course has two complimentary goals:

 (1) Students will be exposed to foundations of the Christian faith. They will be able to articulate Christianity's answers to the big questions of life… Who, What, When, Where, and Why? 

(2) Students will be empowered to make sound decisions for every part of their life: emotionally, physically, socially, spiritually, mentally, and financially.

Life of Christ Positive Action for Christ

Prerequisite:  None

Eligibility:  9-12

To many people Christ is merely a historical fact, rather than a living, personal reality.  Jesus, the God-Man, is no more real to many than George Washington.  We know that Christ lived, and we know much about what He did; however, even we as Christians seldom experience His presence, as we should.  The purpose of The Life of Christ from the Gospel of John is to make Jesus Christ real to our students.  The objective is to further John’s stated purpose in John 20:30-31 to encourage in the lives of students a response to Christ.  Much is said in this study about customs, geography, and dates.  This study puts the student in Israel with Jesus during the years A.D. 26-30.  The study points out the seasons of the year, the time of day, and even the weather to help the students relive those exciting days when Jesus Christ, God in the flesh, walked the earth and ministered to the people in Israel.  We pray that as our students journey through this material that each student will not only know Jesus more, but also love Him more.

Proverbs Positive Action for Christ

Prerequisite:  None

Eligibility:  9-12

Proverbs 14:27 says the fear of the Lord is a fountain of life.  Just as a fountain has an origin, so do the principles of right living.  In this study, students are confronted with the origins of rules, conduct, and character.  From this fountainhead pours waters that provide nourishment and strength for life.  Proverbs:  The Fountain of Life leads through a multitude of lessons, teaching many invaluable principles.  Rather than being a verse-by-verse study, these lessons approach the Book of Proverbs topically in two major divisions:  wisdom defined and wisdom applied to daily living.

Students will be challenged to embrace the origins of rules, define and recognize acceptable and non-acceptable conduct, and study how Godly character is developed through the application of Biblical wisdom to life.  

Change: Transforming Principles from the Beatitudes Positive Action for Christ

Prerequisite:  None

Eligibility:  9-12

This study is geared toward producing genuine internal changes in each student through an in-depth look at the attitudes highlighted by Christ in Matthew 5:1-10. The Beatitudes, the pearl of Scripture, are literally bursting with truth.  They set forth in an unsurpassed manner the inner state of the mind and heart. While studying The Beatitudes students study Scripture that is deeply spiritual, fundamentally doctrinal and essentially practical.

Worldviews and Apologetics

Prerequisite:  None

Eligibility:  12

Students will learn about the various voices in their surrounding culture, which will either positively or negatively shape internal beliefs.  These voices will be compared against the traditional Christian voice in order to emphasize the “reason for belief” behind the Christian faith. Students will take time to examine what they believe, challenged to accept responsibility for their faith and personal choices, embrace the idea that their faith will be tested both in the classroom and in life, and finally, will be encouraged to study, develop, and defend their own Christian worldview.

Bible Worship

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation and audition

Eligibility: 9-12

This course is designed for those students that have sought out to be used of God through the art of worship leading.  This is done, in this course, through the following means:  singing, playing an instrument, learning a trade within the technical media production and leading God’s people in worship.

To adequately prepare these students to lead, ultimately cfa Academy students, in weekly chapel worship through the means mentioned above.  This training will also help equip these students to lead and serve on their local church worship teams, college ministry groups and any future worship related endeavors they may seek.


English

English 9 / Honors English 9 Bob Jones University

Prerequisite: Honors 9 - A in 8th grade English or A / B in 8th grade Honors English

Eligibility: 9

Literature

Fundamentals of Literature teaches the student to be a discerning reader by focusing on the fundamentals of literature—conflict, character, theme, structure, point of view, and moral tone. The student studies contemporary and classic American, British, and world authors in four genres: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Critical thinking skills are encouraged throughout the text through discussion questions. Concepts and literary works are analyzed using scriptural applications.

Approach 

  • Critical 

Organization 

  • Six unit divisions: conflict, theme, character, structure, point of view, moral tone 

Content 

  • Range of selections: classic to contemporary 
  • Genres represented: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama 
  • Cultures represented: American, English, French, Russian, Swedish, Japanese
    Supplementary material: Cyrano de Bergerac (video) 

Features

  • The introductory essays focus on six basic elements of literature. These elements lay the foundation for the student’s understanding of interpretive literature and prepare him for the more detailed literary analysis in the tenth-grade text. In addition, the text uses Scripture passages to illustrate and clarify literary concepts. The unit introduction, as well as the headnotes and end questions for each story, encourages the student to use the in- formation gleaned from reading to find meaning, to analyze that meaning in light of Scripture, and to apply the lessons to life. 

Writing and Grammar

Writing & Grammar 9 reviews the eight parts of speech, five basic sentence patterns, usage, and mechanics. The 9th-grade English educational materials introduces relative pronouns, pronoun reference problems, and indicative/imperative mood. Dictionary skills, library skills, study skills, and the writing process are exercised and implemented throughout the course. Writing projects include a comparison/contrast paragraph, a personal narrative, a research essay, a personal response to literature.

Parts of Speech (and Verbals) 

  • Review of all from Grade 8 plus the following new material: noun—collective; verb— indicative and imperative moods; adjective—determiner; adverb—qualifier, relative; preposition—phrasal; conjunction— subordinating; verbals—verbal phrases with objects 

Sentence Structure 

  • Review of all from Grade 8 plus the following new material: dependent clause— adverb clause; clause structure—compound-complex 

Mechanics 

  • Capitalization; punctuation; spelling 

Usage 

  • Review of all from Grade 8 plus the following new material: modifier placement—misplaced modifier, two-way modifier, dangling modifier 

Writing Skills

  • Review of all from Grade 8 plus the following new material: paragraph development—comparison/contrast; style—conciseness, smoothness, fresh words; sentence variety—length and complexity, sentence patterns, sentence beginnings; sentence expansion and reduction—dependent clauses, phrases, single words; sentence logic—misplaced and dangling modifiers; parallelism; avoiding biased language 

Examples of Writing Projects 

  • Description: comparison/contrast paper 
  • Exposition: five-paragraph research essay, storyboard (public service announcement) 
  • Narration: personal experience 
  • Persuasion: devotional
  • Poetry: quatrain, diamante 

Study & Reference Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 8 plus the following new material: dictionary—inflected forms, variant spellings, field label, stylistic label; library—Cutter number; reference tools—New York Times Index, subject index, yearbook, Bible commentary; reading comprehension—comparison and context; test-taking strategies—analogy 

 

English 10 / Honors English 10 Bob Jones University

Prerequisite: Honors English 10 – A in English 9 or A / B in Honors English 9

Eligibility: 10

Literature 

Elements of Literature broadens students’ understanding of literature by teaching the method and importance of literary analysis. The literature selections and analysis questions promote critical thinking skills as key to understanding and appreciating literature.

Approach 

  • Critical 

Organization 

  • Eight units divided into two parts: marks and modes of literature and genres of literature 

Content 

  • Marks and modes of literature: imaginative comparison, sound and syntax, allusion and symbol, irony 
  • Genres of literature: folktale and epic, essay and short story, poetry, drama 

Features 

  • This textbook builds on the critical foundation provided in the ninth-grade text. Having mastered the six fundamental components of literature, students are ready to focus on those literary elements that de ne 
  • and distinguish lasting artistic literature. Introductory essays, “Thinking Zones,” and critical- thinking questions deepen students’ understanding of key elements of style and expression as well as major forms important 

Features 

  • The texts use a variety of learning methods, including word stories and spelling helps. Lessons incorporate biblical stories with a focus on character building and are often related to other subjects students may be learning. 

Content 

  • This text focuses on Greek prefixes and roots, clipped words, compounds, blends, diminutives, reduplication, and onomatopoeia words. to past and present literature. A firm grasp of these details will aid in developing essential skills in literary analysis and appreciation, skills that can be profitably applied to a study of Scripture. In addition, careful evaluation of worldview as expressed in an author’s writing trains students to exercise biblically based moral discernment. 

Writing and Grammar

Writing & Grammar 10 teaches the eight parts of speech, verbal phrases, clauses, usage, and mechanics of English grammar. The English educational materials also reviews the five basic sentence patterns. Reference chapters include library skills and test-taking strategies. The textbook guides students through the writing process and teaches effective writing strategies.

Parts of Speech (and Verbals) 

  • Review of all from Grade 9 plus the following new material: verb—subjunctive mood; pronoun—indefinite, relative, reciprocal; adverb—conjunctive; verbals—perfect gerund, passive infinitive 

Sentence Structure 

  • Review of all from Grade 9 plus the following new material: sentence patterns—S-be-Advl, S-TrV- DO-OC; dependent clause—noun clause 

Mechanics 

  • Capitalization; punctuation; appendix of spelling rules 

Usage 

  • Review of all from Grade 9 plus the following new material: modi er placement—split in nitive 

Writing Skills

  • Review of all from Grade 9 plus the following new material: essay—choosing a mode; sentence variety and emphasis— choosing between constructions, coordination and subordination; sentence energy—action verbs, details, accuracy, figurative language; sentence logic—logical comparison, clear comparison, subject placement 

Examples of Writing Projects 

  • Description: eyewitness report
  • Exposition: research essay, cause- and-effect essay
  • Narration: short story, oral anecdote 
  • Persuasion: persuasive speech, editorial 
  • Poetry: poetry and metaphor 
  • Multimedia: webpage design 

Study & Reference Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 9 plus the following new material: library—website, bibliography, online databases; reading comprehension—grammatical context; test-taking strategies— essay questions 

 

English 11 / Honors English 11 Bob Jones University

Prerequisite: Honors English 11 – A in English 10 or A / B in Honors English10

Eligibility: 11

Literature

American Literature introduces students to more than seventy authors in a study that connects the authors' lives and beliefs as revealed in their writings with the corresponding literary periods. Lessons examine Colonial-Revolutionary, Romantic, Realistic/Naturalistic, and Modern periods and issues relevant to each period such as Darwinism and religious liberalism.

Approach 

  • Historical 

Organization 

  • Five major literary divisions: early American literature, American romanticism, American realism and naturalism, modern American literature, contemporary American literature 

Content 

  • Early American literature: settlement, religious experience, revolution 
  • American romanticism: minor romantics (Knickerbockers, New England School), major romantics (transcendental optimists, transcendental pessimists), voices of conflict 
  • American realism and naturalism: regionalists, realists and naturalists 
  • Modern American literature: modern poetry, modern prose and drama 
  • Contemporary American literature: contemporary poetry, contemporary prose 

Features

  • The units are arranged according to major literary periods. Timelines, unit and chapter introductions, author biographies, and brief headnotes help students build necessary background knowledge of the historical and cultural context from which a literary work arises. A before-reading page precedes each selection and introduces students to three reading tasks: analyzing a work for its technical features, employing a reading strategy to aid comprehension, and evaluating a work’s ideas from a biblical worldview. These three tasks help students develop critical-thinking skills and a deep understanding of the ideas and writings of literary and historical figures. 
  • During-reading questions, which appear throughout each selection in the margin, guide students through the three reading tasks. 
  • After reading, students answer Think and Discuss questions, many of which require them
    to demonstrate a high level of understanding of the concepts traced throughout their reading and lesson. 

Writing and Literature

Writing & Grammar 11 (3rd edition) presents the eight parts of speech, verbal phrases, clauses, usage, and mechanics. Review the seven sentence patterns and introduce advanced concepts such as tense sequence, perfect verbals, and adverbial nouns. Reference chapters include library and study skills. Writing projects include the research paper, literary analysis, folktale, narrative poem, hymn, analytical essay, interview, memoir, analogy, in-class essay, and letter to the editor. 

Parts of Speech (and Verbals) 

  • Review of all from Grade 10 plus the following new material: verb—verb-adverb combinations; adverb—indefinite relative, interrogative; conjunction— phrasal subordinating; verbals— perfect participle, passive gerund, perfect infinitive, progressive infinitive, elliptical infinitive 

Sentence Structure 

  • Review of all from Grade 10 plus the following new material: sentence patterns—retained object in passive sentence 

Mechanics 

  • Capitalization; punctuation; appendix of spelling rules 

Usage 

  • Review of all from Grade 10 plus the following new material: pronoun shift; verb tense consistency and sequence 

Writing Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 10 plus the following new material: paragraph organization—cause- and-e ect order, comparison- and-contrast order; sentence energy—pauses for breath; parallelism—clarity; sentence logic—direct expression, logical predication, avoiding mixed constructions, using noun clauses when needed, ending in strength, linking with new information 

Examples of Writing Projects 

  • Description: interview
  • Exposition: formal research paper, analytical essay, critical response to literature
  • Narration: narrative poem, folktale
  • Persuasion: letter to editor 
  • Poetry: hymn 

Study & Reference Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 10 plus the following new material: reference tools—literary index, literary sources 

 

AP English Language and Composition SevenStar Online

Prerequisite: Honors English 10 – A in Honors English 10 and 4.0 GPA

Eligibility: 11

Major concepts/content: An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. The college composition course for which the AP English Language and Composition course substitutes is one of the most varied in the curriculum.

 

English 12 / Honors English 12 Bob Jones University

Prerequisite: Honors English 12 – A in English 11 or A / B in Honors English 11

Eligibility: 12

Literature

British Literature discusses literature selections and cultural issues from eight literary periods in light of Scripture: Old English, Middle English, Tudor, Stuart, Neoclassical, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern. The literature collection traces English Christianity from its beginning to the present and studies Shakespeare’s drama Macbeth.

Approach 

  • Historical 

Organization 

  • Four major literary divisions: the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Age of Revolution, the Age of Reform 

Content 

  • The Middle Ages: the Old English period, the Middle English period 
  • The Renaissance: the Tudor period, the Stuart period 
  • The Age of Revolution: the Neoclassic period, the Romantic period 
  • The Age of Reform: the Victorian period, the Modern period 
  • Supplementary material: Macbeth (video) 

Features

  • The units are arranged according to major literary periods. The material provided through the unit introductions, headnotes, and timelines enables the student to analyze individual authors and their works in a historical and cultural context. Such analysis serves to broaden the student’s world, enabling him to understand the ideas and writings of noted literary and historical figures and to apply biblical criteria when evaluating the beliefs espoused by such figures. The questions for thought and discussion, which follow the selections, progress from factual to evaluative and are valuable both for class discussion and for providing students with an opportunity to develop further literary and moral discernment. 

Writing and Grammar

Writing & Grammar 12 teaches the eight parts of speech, verbal phrases, clauses, usage, and mechanics. The English educational materials also reviews the seven sentence patterns, introduces advanced grammar concepts such as tense sequence, perfect verbals, and adverbial nouns, and leads students through the writing process, teaching writing strategies such as variety, emphasis, and sentence logic. Writing projects include a research paper, a literary analysis, a narrative poem, an analytical essay, an interview, and an in-class essay.

Parts of Speech (and Verbals) 

  • Review of all from Grade 11 plus the following new material: verbals—passive participle 

Sentence Structure 

  • Review of all from Grade 11 plus the following new material: absolute phrase 

Mechanics 

  • Capitalization; punctuation; appendix of spelling rules 

Usage 

  • Review of all from Grade 11 plus the following new material: idiomatic use of prepositions 

Writing Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 11 plus the following new material: paragraph development—quotation, visual aid 

Examples of Writing Projects 

  • Description: descriptive essay, comparison/contrast essay 
  • Exposition: research report, response to a dramatic scene (literary analysis) 
  • Narration: dramatic scene, interior monologue 
  • Persuasion: persuasive essay 
  • Poetry: sonnet
  • Multimedia: video report 

Study & Reference Skills 

  • Review of all from Grade 11 

 

AP English Literature and Composition Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing, AP Edition, Prentice Hall

Prerequisite: A in Honors English 11; teacher recommendation

Eligibility: 12

AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful

reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of

selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language

to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider

a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the

use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.


Spanish

Spanish I Bob Jones/ AMSCO (Companeros Vol. 1)

Prerequisite: 9th graders – A in 8th grade English

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Spanish I course covers fundamentals of grammar including oral reading, dialogues, translations, Scripture verses, greetings and introductions, simple questions and answers, family members, shopping, personality descriptions, classroom objects and much more. In this introductory Spanish class, students learn how to ask and answer questions, give and follow directions, purchase items, make small talk, how to conjugate all present tense verbs, and present the gospel. Class exercises and activities are geared to give students a foundational understanding of Spanish communication and the present tense. The goal of Spanish I is for students gain the confidence to begin to learn and speak Spanish.

Spanish II Bob Jones/ AMSCO (Companeros Vol. 2)

Prerequisite: Acceptable performance in Spanish I

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

In the Spanish II course the students learn to communicate at an intermediate level with Spanish-speakers in a store, a bank, an airport, a hotel, a doctor's office, and on the mission field. Grammar, pronunciation, spelling, writing, listening, talking, verb tenses, and moods are emphasized in a variety of exercises. Building on the base from Spanish I, students will learn how to use the future tense and both versions of the past tense (preterite and imperfect). Additionally, students will learn how to use reflexive pronouns, participles, direct objects, and a wide variety of vocabulary. This curriculum will also include Latin American and Spanish geography and culture lessons. The goals of Spanish 2 are to master understanding of past, present, and future tenses, and gain the vocabulary knowledge to communicate in a variety of locations and situations.

Spanish III/IV Bob Jones/ AMSCO (Companeros Vol. 2)/ La Casa En Mango Street

Prerequisite: Acceptable performance in preceding Spanish course; teacher recommendation

Eligibility: 11, 12

The Spanish III course further develops students' mastery of vocabulary, oral communication skills, reading and writing skills, and grammatical structure with a special focus on advanced verb forms. Students are introduced to Latin American and Spanish culture through reading and translation assignments. Spanish IV involves a more in-depth vocabulary study as well as a more advanced level of reading and writing of the Spanish language. From the simple to the complex, the students gain the confidence to share their ideas and opinions in Spanish. Students develop the conversational skills to plan adventures, care for their health and travel abroad. They talk about government, work, education, movies, family, and more. Students learn to express their ideas and opinions in Spanish both orally and in writing.


Math

Pre-Algebra: Virtual School Alpha Omega

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9

The Pre-Algebra course is a preparatory course for Algebra I.  The review of essential algebra and geometry concepts helps students master and remember concepts for a long time. 

Algebra I Saxon

Prerequisite: Mastery of pre-algebra or equivalent course

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Algebra I course concentrates on the fundamental aspects of problem solving and the development of personal discipline to maximize the mathematical talents of the student.  The course covers many topics including number systems, rules and procedures for expressions and equations, inequalities, graphing in the Cartesian coordinate system, word problems, unit conversions, statistics and beginning geometry.  Some topics are introduced and developed to a complex level, while others are introduced and will be developed in the Algebra II course.

Geometry (MacDougal and Littell)

Prerequisite: Mastery of Algebra I

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Geometry course emphasizes reasoning and logical thinking.  A formal approach is used including coordinate, synthetic and transformational geometry, connections to algebra, data analysis, probability, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, and the incorporation of two-column proofs throughout the course.  To be successful in this course, a student needs to have average to above average reading comprehension and writing skills.  Honors Geometry involves a more in-depth study of the theorems and proofs.  Geometry challenges the student to draw conclusions from hypotheses involving abstract concepts.  

Honors Geometry

Prerequisite: Honors Geometry-A in Algebra I

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Honors Geometry courses emphasize reasoning and logical thinking.  A formal approach is used including coordinate, synthetic and transformational geometry, connections to algebra, data analysis, probability, trigonometry, discrete mathematics, and the incorporation of two-column proofs throughout the course.  To be successful in this course, a student needs to have average to above average reading comprehension and writing skills.  Honors Geometry involves a more in-depth study of the theorems and proofs.  Geometry challenges the student to draw conclusions from hypotheses involving abstract concepts.  

Algebra II /Honors Algebra II Saxon

Prerequisite: Mastery of Algebra I; Honors-A in algebra I

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

The Algebra II course is a continuation in the study of advanced algebraic concepts including functions, polynomials, rational expressions, systems of functions and inequalities and matrices.  Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphic, algebraic, numeric, tabular and verbal representations of relations and use those representations to solve problems. 

AP Computer Science A SevenStar Online

Prerequisite: A in Algebra I, A in Geometry, A in Algebra II, 4.0 GPA

Students will play the role of a "survivor" while they work their way through the course material. AP Computer Science A is a college-level computer course covering the applications of computing within the context of programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures. This is a one-year course and students will be able to take the College Board Computer Science A examination in May. The computer language that will be used is Java, which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform. 

  • Design and implement computer-based solutions to problems in a variety of application areas.
  • Use and implement well-known algorithms and data structures.
  • Develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures to solve problems.
  • Code fluently in an object-oriented paradigm using the programming language Java.
  • Use the standard Java library classes from the AP Java subset.
  • Read and understand a large program consisting of several classes and interacting objects. 
  • Identify the major hardware and software components of a computer system, their relationship to one another, and the roles of these components within the system.
  • Recognize the ethical and social implications of computer use.

Consumer Math: Virtual School Ignitia

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Credit earned: 1 credit

 This course reviews basic math concepts, teaches students to plan and organize personal finances, and examines loans and credit cards.  Useful topics like taxes, insurance, and retirement are also discussed. Students learn important money management skills.

Advanced Functions and Modeling Key Curriculum Press

Prerequisite: Algebra II

Eligibility: 11, 12

In the Advanced Modeling Functions course, students are provided with an in depth-study of modeling and applying functions.  They will be expected to use logarithmic functions, to graph exponential functions, and to apply the trigonometric functions.  Students learn to convert between rectangular and polar coordinates.    

Honors Pre-Calculus (Saxon)

Prerequisite: 10th graders- 80 in Algebra II; 11th graders-90 in Algebra II

Eligibility: 11, 12

The Honors Pre-Calculus course fully integrates topics from geometry, algebra, trigonometry, discrete mathematics and mathematical analysis. Students work progressively on more elaborate word problems throughout the problem sets. Students will be able to solve challenging problems such as abstract quantities and rate problems.  

Pre-Calculus (A Beka)

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II,

Eligibility: 10,11,12

The Pre-Calculus course fully integrates topics from geometry, algebra, trigonometry, discrete mathematics and mathematical analysis. Students work progressively on more elaborate word problems throughout the problem sets. 

AP Calculus (Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, by Finney, 3rd Media Edition)

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus; teacher recommendation

Eligibility: 12

After a condensed, intensive review of the algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry topics, necessary for success in Calculus, the Calculus course covers topics in the syllabus for the College Board’s Advanced Placement AB Calculus exam.  First semester deals with the above review topics in addition to a study of functions, limits, released rates and interpretation, application of integrals and slope fields.  Students are encouraged to take the AP Calculus Exam given in May. The main goal of this third edition is to realign with the changes in the Advanced Placement (AP) calculus syllabus and the new type of AP exam questions. 


Science

Earth Science: Virtual School Ignitia

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Earth Science course is a study of the earth, its place in the universe and the general concepts of Earth Science that are significant to all Christians.  The course concentrates on the celestial sphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere.

Physical Science Apologia

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9

This course discusses such topics as the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, weather, the structure of the earth, environmentalism, the physics of motion, Newton’s Laws, gravity, and astrophysics.  There are many hands-on experiments to do.  This course continues to guide students to master scientific material and defend their faith using scientific knowledge. It is an excellent course for preparing the student to take a college-prep high school science curriculum.

Biology (Apologia)

Prerequisite: Physical Science or equivalent 

Eligibility: 9, 10,11,12

This course is designed to be the student’s first high school science course and is a college-prep biology course that provides a detailed introduction to the methods and concepts of general biology. Heavily emphasizing the vocabulary of biology, it provides the student with a strong background in the scientific method, the five-kingdom classification scheme, microscopy, biochemistry, cellular biology, molecular and Mendelian genetics, evolution, dissection, and ecosystems. It also provides a complete survey of the five kingdoms in Creation. Students who take and understand this course will be very well prepared for a tough university biology course.

 Honors Biology (Bob Jones)

Prerequisite:  A in preceding science course

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

The Honors Biology courses are a study of cells, genetics, microbes, protozoan, plants and animals. Honors Biology is a more in-depth study of God’s creation and His principles.  The students will do many hands-on activities and learn to apply the information beyond the textbook. Students will be prepared for future science classes.

Anatomy and Physiology (Apologia)

Prerequisite: Biology or Honors Biology

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

This course covers both the anatomy and the physiology of the human body’s 11 organ systems in detail. The course is for those interested in science-related fields. Anatomy and physiology is a discussion and laboratory based study of the human body. The study will range from molecules, cells, body systems, and processes. This course is designed for college preparation, especially for biology and health career majors.

Honors Anatomy and Physiology (Apologia)

Prerequisite: A in Biology or B or higher in Honors Biology

Eligibility: 10,11,12

It covers both the anatomy and the physiology of the human body’s 11 organ systems in detail. The course is for those interested in science-related fields. Anatomy and physiology is a discussion and laboratory based study of the human body. The study will range from molecules, cells, body systems, and processes. This course is designed for college preparation, especially for biology and health career majors.

AP Biology (Seven Star Online)

Prerequisite: A in Honors Biology, G.P.A. 4.0 or higher

Eligibility: 10,11,12
The AP Biology course is designed to give students a first year introductory biology experience.  Paramount to this experience is addressing content within the three basic subject areas, molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, and organisms and populations.  Included in this experience are a variety of laboratory experiences, including the 12 AP Biology labs.  Through completion of course activities, students acquire a framework for understanding science as a process, recognizing unifying themes, and applying the knowledge they gain to critical thought about environmental and social issues. 

This course is designed to be highly teacher facilitated. Instructors give a great deal of specific and timely feedback per lesson as students progress through the course.  Students have opportunities for oral examinations, discussions, and whiteboards.  Additionally teachers conduct online synchronous Elluminate sessions that require critical thinking and analysis.

In addition, this course is accompanied by an online tutorial and review that uses released AP Exams.  Students are given systematic and timed practice for all portions of the exam.  Students receive specific feedback on progress and mastery levels on the practice exams.

Chemistry Bob Jones

Prerequisite: Algebra II credit or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

The Chemistry course is a study of substances: what they are made of, how they react, and how they change.  The fundamental ideas of chemistry deal with the nature of elements and the ways in which elements combine to form compounds.  Some topics discussed include atomic theory, equations, the periodic table, acid-base theories and chemical bonding. Discussion will include a regular lab component to facilitate hands on understanding. 

AP Chemistry Prentice Press

Prerequisite: A in Chemistry; teacher recommendation

Eligibility: 11, 12

The objective of the AP Chemistry course is to continue preparing students who plan to attend a university or college for study in Science and/or Engineering.  Students are encouraged to take the AP Chemistry Exam given in May.    A lab component includes heavy instruction on the role of effective lab notebook as well as lab reports.   

Honors Physics Bob Jones

Prerequisite: Finite Math, Advanced Functions, or Pre-Calculus or concurrent enrollment in either 

Eligibility: 11,12

The Physics course covers the study of motion, forces, and energy.  The students will see how God endowed the universe with all types of energy to enable it to run its course.  Forces bonding the nuclei of atoms as well as forces that keep the planets in orbit around the sun are studied keeping in mind that God is the source of all power in the entire universe.  Labs allow students to evaluate proper properties of motion illustrated in class through mechanics.


History

World History / Honors World History (Bob Jones)

Prerequisite: Honors World History – A in preceding social studies course 

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The World History/Honors World History courses are a study of the basic facts and themes of the world. The emphasis of the course is on the Christian view of World History and the providence of God throughout the history of the world.  Geography and cultural awareness as well as current events will be explored.  Emphasis will be placed on cause and effect.  Honors World History is an in-depth writing intensive course-preparing students for Government/Economics, Honors Government/Economics, Honors US History, and/or AP US History.

AP World History (SevenStar Online)

Prerequisite: A in preceding social studies course, 4.0 GPA

Eligibility: 10, 11,12

AP World History covers the history of the world from 600 C.E. to the present with an introduction unit on the period before (covering around 8000 B.C.E to 600 C.E.). The course emphasizes “patterns of change” and the connections between the various world cultures throughout the time period being studied. Students will gain an understanding of the global experiences of humanity and be able to apply that knowledge to their growth and development as “world citizens”. The class has two major goals: 1) to prepare students to be successful on the AP World History exam and 2) to provide students with an understanding on why the world developed the way it did. A Christian worldview of history teaches that from God’s creation of the world until Christ’s return, history revolves around His resurrection and leads towards His coming again. It is therefore imperative that the study of history also includes exploration of God’s purpose with humanity and His continuing work. Each module will contain a devotional thought that guides the learner towards a closer relationship with God and an understanding of the individual’s purpose in God’s plan. These will be individually graded assignments, unlike the other discussion forum assignments.

Government/Economics / Honors Government/Economics (Glencoe)

Prerequisite: Honors Government / Economics - A in preceding social studies course

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

The Government & Economics/Honors Government & Economics courses focus on the "how and why" of the American Government and Economic system.  The Government section is designed to educate students in practical elements of citizenship and the workings of American government, including an understanding of the US Constitution.  The Economics section is designed to help students gain perspective and understanding of the American economic system. Honors Government & Economics is a writing intensive course with emphasis upon how primary sources are connected to our government.

AP US Government and Politics (SevenStar Online)

Prerequisite: A in preceding honors level Social Studies course, 4.0 G.P.A.

Eligibility: 10,11,12

Credit: ½

Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics is a college level course designed to give the student an analytical perspective of government and politics in America.  Course content will begin with foundations of United States Government, progress into an analysis of political beliefs and why Americans behave as they do and the impact of the media. This course includes an intensive focus on the four government institutions followed by a study of civil rights and civil liberties in America, their evolution through judicial interpretation and the evolving role of the 14th amendment on American’s civil rights and liberties. The course will culminate with a breakdown of how public policy is created and the linkages between the political process, political parties, interest groups and elections. The course requires familiarity with the various institutions groups belies, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will gain knowledge through a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations.

Student assessment occurs at a variety of levels throughout the course. Students are assessed via oral examination and other synchronous sessions.  Actual course assessment types include student assessed work, auto-graded, partially auto-graded, and totally instructor graded assignments.

This course is designed to be highly teacher facilitated.  Instructors give a great deal of specific and timely feedback.  Students have opportunities for oral examinations, discussions, and whiteboard sessions.  Teachers conduct synchronous elluminate sessions, which require critical thinking and analysis of articles, tables, data, free-response questions, and general discussion.

Goals: Students successfully completing this course will...

  • Know important facts, concepts and theories pertaining to U.S. government and politics.
  • Understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences
  • Be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics.

AP Macro Economics SevenStar Online

Prerequisite: A in preceding honors level Social Studies course, 4.0 G.P.A.

Eligibility: 10,11,12

Credit: ½

You have been called upon to assist the leader of the Macro Islands who is running for reelection next year. The economy is in shambles, and you need to come up with some feasible solutions. This will not only help the people of the Macro Islands but will also ensure a victory for your employer.

You were hired over the Internet and received a first class ticket to the Macro Islands where you can learn first hand about the situation. You arrive at Pineapple Airport in the middle of the day and are met by a man with a briefcase who is holding a sign with your name on it. You approach the man and introduce yourself.

"I'm Mr. Scarcity," he says. "I'll be your guide as you learn about the economic situation of the islands. You need to learn everything you can about both macroeconomics and our Macro Islands for your presentation to our island leader in May." (Your AP Exam.)

AP Micro Economics SevenStar Online

Prerequisite: A in preceding honors level Social Studies course, 4.0 G.P.A.

Eligibility: 10,11,12

Credit: ½

Prepare to earn college credits while learning all the essential concepts required by the College Board as YOU travel to Macro Islands to assist the leader in winning reelection. While you go there for a job, you will soon realize that you love the islands and want to make your home there. Because you are adept at giving economic advice to the leader, you will be appointed as the new President of the Sunny Sea Shell Company. As part of your role in assuming the leadership duties of the company, you will need to brush up on microeconomics. The Board of Directors has appointed Ms. Equilibrium to act as your personal assistant and advisor as you transition into your new role. You will be learning all you can about microeconomics and will be required to exhibit your knowledge in May at the annual Board of Director's meeting (the AP Exam).
During your stay, Ms. Equilibrium will ask you to complete assignments showing that you understand the information and that you are the right person for the job. These assignments will take the form of: discussion postings, oral quizzes, self check assignments, instructor graded assignments, and exams. You will find these lessons and assignments in the course’s 6 modules.

United States History / Honors United States History (Bob Jones)

Prerequisite: Honors US History – A in preceding social studies course

Eligibility: 11, 12

The United States History/Honors United States History courses are the study of the United States from colonization to the present. The emphasis of this course is on God’s hand in the formation of our country and Christianity’s impact on our culture.  Causes for the main events in the history of the United States will be covered as well as results.  Currents events will also be an integral part of the course.  Honors United States History is a writing intensive course with great emphasis placed on cause and effect surrounding events in the history of the United States.

AP United States History (Houghton Mifflin Company)

Prerequisite: A in preceding social studies course; teacher recommendation

Eligibility: 11, 12

The AP United States History course is an intensive, in-depth study of the history of the United States.  Emphasis will be placed on the Christian view of the United States and the plan of God for its foundation and development as a world power.  The writing intensive course places great emphasis on cause and effect.  This is a college level course in which students may earn college credit upon scoring high enough on the Advanced Placement US History Exam.  Students are encouraged to take the AP History Exam given in May.

AP Art History (SevenStar Online)

Prerequisite: A in Honors World History, A in Honors English II or III 4.0 GPA

Eligibility: 11, 12

This course will provide students with college level instruction in the history of art. Students will examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. Students will learn to look at these works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate what they see or experience in light of a Christian worldview. Students will able to identify the presence or absence of Biblical truth reflected in art and architecture through the centuries. 


Health/Physical Education

Health / Physical Education Ignitia

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9

The Health component is the study of the care and development of the human body.  Students study the benefits of being fit and maintaining a good self-image.  Students also learn and implement strategies for healthy and Godly living.  In the Physical Education component, students apply basic skills and techniques of team and individual sports.  Skills taught are beginning and intermediate football, softball/baseball, soccer, basketball and volleyball.  Students will learn and apply basic cardiovascular conditioning principles through participation in a structured walking program.  All sports address Christian perspectives through competition.


Fine Arts

Art I, II, III, IV

Prerequisite: Interest in Art; satisfactory completion of each preceding level 

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The Art program is designed for students who express an interest in exploring different methods and media in the area of studio art.  The program begins with a general survey of various methods and media.  The students will create original artworks in drawing, painting, printmaking, pottery, sculpture, and graphic arts.  The students will review and use the basic elements and principles of art as well as be exposed to the major artists and art movements, both past and present that have helped define art history.  The goal of Art I is for students to have a general grasp of art fundamentals and techniques, while gaining an appreciation of the Fine Arts in a positive and spiritual enriching environment.  The projects with each progressing level are more challenging and the expectations are higher than the previous level.  As students progress to Art II, they will correctly incorporate the basic elements and principles of art in their work.  These students will begin to develop a more specialized area of interest and improve on their own individual style.  Creative thinking, problem solving, as well as, analytical, interpretive and perceptive abilities will be developed and strengthened.  As Art III/IV students, they will be asked to form a thesis and then develop a portfolio around that thesis using different mediums and techniques.  All students will be encouraged to bring glory to God through their God given talents as well as reflect the creative nature of God, the ultimate creator, through their work. 

Band I, II, III, IV

Prerequisite: Interest in Band; satisfactory completion in preceding level

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12 

Students will learn the fundamental skills needed to play in a band.  The teacher will develop the student as a musician through practice and playing a wide variety of music, helping the student perform to the best of his/her ability.  Students will participate in two school concerts and at least one performance outside of school.

Drama / ChorusTheater Arts I, II, III, IV

Prerequisite: Interest in Drama / Chorus; satisfactory completion of preceding level 

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12 

Through theater arts, students increase their understanding of self and others and develop clear ideas about the world. Through a variety of theatrical experiences, students communicate in a dramatic form, make artistic choices, solve problems, build positive self-concepts, and relate interpersonally. Students increase their understanding of heritage and traditions through historical and cultural studies in theatre. Student response and evaluation promote thinking and further discriminating judgment, developing students who are appreciative and evaluative consumers of live theatre, film, television, and other technologies.

Students will learn elements of drama and conventions of theatre such as warm-up techniques, improvisation, pantomime, and effective voice and diction. Students will also interpret characters, using the voice and body expressively, and create dramatizations. Students will apply design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills through participating in productions.

Yearbook I, II, III, IV

Prerequisite: Interest in writing and publication; completion of application; satisfactory completion of preceding level

Eligibility:  9, 10, 11, 12

The Yearbook class develops skills in layout design, writing, proofreading, photojournalism, computer, and ad sales.  Students will be assigned layouts in all levels of the school and will learn style and theme development for those schools.  Students will learn the values of diligence, responsibility, accountability, commitment and teamwork in producing a quality yearbook.

Music Technology and Application

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

***This course is offered as student participation warrants. A minimum of 8 students is required.***

The purpose of the M.A.T. class is to introduce the traditional and non-traditional music student to cutting-edge technology that can be used to create industry standard music, music videos, commercials, movies and presentations.  M.A.T.  is a technology course that couples STEM initiatives and the Arts together!  M.A.T is a course designed to immerse students into the world of recording, editing and creating musical and digital content that is so prevalent on today's world stage!  Using cutting-edge tools and practical skills that are key in today’s ever-changing marketplace!


Electives

Computer(Glencoe)

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 1

In the Computercourse, students learn several Microsoft Office 2010 applications.  Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point are the main focuses.  Through hands-on learning, students create letters, lists, charts and mailing labels with Microsoft Word.  With Microsoft Excel, students learn to use functions, generate charts and format worksheets.  Microsoft PowerPoint allows students to construct elaborate slide show presentations that include charts and pictures.  Students edit and enhance these presentations through layouts, graphics, slide transitions and formatting.  This course also emphasizes critical thinking to help students apply the applications to real world experiences. It is age-level and interest-level appropriate. The course includes integration of basic language arts and mathematics skills. This course credit or documentation proving computer competency is required for graduation.

AP Computer Science A SevenStar

Prerequisite: A in Algebra I, A in Geometry, A in Algebra II, 4.0 GPA

Eligibility: 10,11,12

Students will play the role of a "survivor" while they work their way through the course material. AP Computer Science A is a college-level computer course covering the applications of computing within the context of programming methodology, algorithms, and data structures. This is a one-year course and students will be able to take the College Board Computer Science A examination in May. The computer language that will be used is Java, which is a free download for either a Macintosh or a Windows platform. 

  • Design and implement computer-based solutions to problems in a variety of application areas.
  • Use and implement well-known algorithms and data structures.
  • Develop and select appropriate algorithms and data structures to solve problems.
  • Code fluently in an object-oriented paradigm using the programming language Java.
  • Use the standard Java library classes from the AP Java subset.
  • Read and understand a large program consisting of several classes and interacting objects. 
  • Identify the major hardware and software components of a computer system, their relationship to one another, and the roles of these components within the system.
  • Recognize the ethical and social implications of computer use. 

Senior Internship

Prerequisite: Part-time job or ability to secure job

Eligibility: 12

The Senior Internship course is designed for students seeking on-the-job training in the workplace or for those students who have a part-time job.  Through a cooperative agreement between the schools, the employer, the student and his/her parent, the student receives a unit of credit for successfully fulfilling employment requirements.  Written training agreements between the school, employers and students are developed.   The student is required to work at least 20 hours per month and the employer completes a quarterly evaluation of the student’s job performance.

Teacher /Office Assistant

Prerequisite: Dependability

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12       

The Teacher/Office Assistant course is designed for those students who are interested in pursuing a career in education, business, or other related fields.  Students have the opportunity to receive hands-on experience in a classroom or office setting.  They serve as an assistant in a classroom, office, or the library with the teacher’s supervision.  Students are expected to demonstrate maturity, responsibility, integrity and an interest in acquiring practical experience.

Weightlifting and Conditioning

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Directed weightlifting and conditioning in the cfa Academy’s athletic department weight room.


Virtual School Electives

One Credit Courses:

Consumer Math VS

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

 This course reviews basic math concepts, teaches students to plan and organize personal finances, and examines loans and credit cards.  Useful topics like taxes, insurance, and retirement are also discussed. Students learn important money management skills.

Integrated Math I VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course provides students with the opportunity to study traditional math topics from algebra, geometry, probability and statistics at an introductory level. One credit of high school math is earned.

Earth Science VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course uncovers the features of God’s amazing world.  Students learn about Earth’s formation, structure, its place within the universe, and cover topics like volcanoes, rocks, minerals, weather, the water cycles, the atmosphere, and the solar system.

General Science VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Beginning with the atomic structure and measurement of matter, students will learn about the physical geology of the earth, fossils, absolute time, the biology of the ocean, space exploration, human body systems and health, ecology, and the environment. The course units include text-based lessons, on and off-computer exercises, special projects, learning games, quizzes, and tests that appeal to today's digital generation and help teachers to evaluate progress and mastery of the materials. Ignitia General Science III enriches the educational experience for Christian school students and sparks a passion for learning.

The Story of the Constitution VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This course follows the exciting steps that led to the birth and development of the U.S. Constitution, the supreme law of the United States. Students discover the events and people who influence the writing of the country’s most important document.  This course is ideal for the students who want to understand the principles of the Constitution and how those principles apply to everyday life.  Also presented is an in-depth look at the amendments.

World Geography VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course offers an in-depth study of the world’s seven continents, along with a look at geography tools and physical geography characteristics. Lessons cover each region’s settlement, culture, politics, economics, and environment.

New Testament Survey VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This course presents a diverse study of the New Testament.  Beginning in the Gospels, students gain concepts from colorful and purpose-driven assignments.  The appealing assorted topics contain rewarding and relevant information for every student.  Students get an intuitive look at the Bible by studying its writer and the sufferings of Christ.  Packed with practicality, the assignments have students reflects on personal evangelism, examine God’s will, and learn their unique gifts.

Old Testament Survey VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This course reviews the chronicles of Christianity and gives students a firm foundation for Christ-centered living.  Additional topics cover King Saul, Jeremiah to Ezekiel, and Daniel to Nehemiah.  This course also overviews the divided kingdom of Israel, the rebuilding of the temple, and Jerusalem.

Bible DoctrineVS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Delving into the ancient past, this course examines the lives of Christians during the tumultuous period of the Roman Empire. Students develop an appreciation for their religious heritage, as they look at the faithfulness of Christ’s followers under persecution.  Students also recognize the important role of Christians in history.  This course teaches about the Roman Church, and the formation of the Bible.  It also provides an in-depth study of friendship, dating, and marriage.

Christian Faith and Living VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12 (recommended for 11th or 12th)

In this course students learn more about themselves and the amazing difference they can make for Christ.  Packed with wisdom and guidance, this course helps high school students prepare for life after graduation.  Students glean from lessons about the attributes of God, world religions, spiritual gifts, and practical Christian living.  Additional topics included ministry options and biblical literature.

Family and Consumer Science (Home Economics) VS

This state-of-the-art elective for Christian schools includes quizzes, tests, and interactive lessons that teach practical, life-long skills like housekeeping, cooking, decorating, financing, caring for children, and building relationships.

Foundations for Living:

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

As a part of a complete learning management system, family and consumer science is a self-directed elective infused with technology-based lessons, tools, and exercises to enrich learning for students, and streamline instruction and administrative tasks for teachers. Like all Ignitia courses, Bible verses (KJV) and biblical references support the development of a Christian worldview and encourage practical Christian living.

Technology and Business:

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Teach students business technology skills with Ignitia Technology and Business for grades 9-12! This 11-unit CTE elective contains online lessons that explore emerging technologies, operating systems, and computer networks. Topics include technical skills, effective communication, and productive work habits. Course content includes interactive lessons, tests, quizzes, and multimedia.

One-half Credit Courses:

Advanced Health VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 10, 11, 12

This course interweaves practical lessons about proper eating habits, social health, home safety, burns, immunizations, drug use and abuse, and sexually transmitted diseases with accountable Christian living.

American Literature VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12 (recommended 11, 12)

This course gives students a clear look at the beginning and development of written works in America. It covers a variety of periods. Filled with works from renowned American writers, this course includes monumental writers such as: Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, Emily Dickenson, Mark Twain, and many more.  Our Town is required reading.

British LiteratureVS

 Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12 (recommended 11, 12)

This course gives students an in-depth look at the beginning and development of written works in Great Britain.  It covers a variety of periods. This course is filled with works from acclaimed British writers like: William Shakespeare, Lord Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning and many more

College Planner VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 11, 12 (recommended 11th or first semester 12th)

This course helps soon-to-be graduates evaluate and select options for their future.  Students are guided in finding the right college, preparing for college entrance exams and application, paying for college, and considering non-college options.  Filled with step-by-step instructions and reminders to seek God’s will, this course is a great prep course for high school students.

Digital Art VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Explore the world of digital skills with your students! Switched-On Online Digital Arts introduces students to digital cameras and the manipulation of digital images with imaging and editing software. Students also explore audio recording and editing, cinematography, and 3D technology. Project-centered, this dynamic, fun elective for grades 9-12 places a strong emphasis on student inquiry, research, and writing to develop 21st century tech-based skill sets. 

Essentials of Business VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Topics of study include functions of a company and effective management practices. Assignments emphasize student inquiry, research, and writing, and external web resources enrich the learning process while encouraging the development of media skills. Hands-on and practical, this Internet-based course helps student apply business concepts to daily life and examine corporate citizenship.

Essentials of Communication VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

With an emphasis on communication theory and language usage in different situations, this course builds confidence and skills.: Essentials of Communication is a self-directed elective infused with technology-based lessons, tools, and exercises to enrich learning for students and streamline instruction and administrative tasks for teachers. Bible verses (KJV) and biblical references support the development of a Christian worldview and encourage practical Christian living.

Essentials of Math VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is perfect for reinforcing fundamental mathematical concepts.  The course’s lessons cover like algebra, geometry, statistics, measurements, and a number review!

Fundamentals of Computer Science

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course prepares students with technological, problem-solving, and interpersonal skills to be used in the world of information technology with Fundamentals of Computer Systems. This elective helps students learn the basics of operating systems, computer hardware, and computer software as they discover that building and maintaining positive customer relations is an integral part of success within the IT industry.

Fundamentals of Digital Media

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students engage web development skills as they study the impact digital and online media have on society. Fundamentals of Digital Media also covers the popularity of social media and explores the ways top online media companies compete with one another as the Internet industry continues to grow.

Fundamentals of Programming and Software Design

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

The course helps tomorrow’s programmers and software developers become well versed in programming language concepts, specifically Java®. Students practice gathering and analyzing customer software needs, learn the core principles of programming, develop software specifications, and evaluate new and emerging software.

Health

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Created especially for Christian high school students, this five-unit course presents relevant health-related concepts and encourages engaging discussion from a biblical perspective. Students will study not only the physical, but also the cultural and social aspects of making healthy choices. As a part of a complete learning management system, high school health is a self-directed course infused with technology-based lessons, tools, and exercises to enrich learning for students and streamline instruction and administrative tasks for teachers. Like all Ignitia courses, Bible verses (KJV) and biblical references support the development of a Christian worldview and encourage practical Christian living.

Introduction to Information Technology

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This online course for grades 9-12 helps students develop a personal career plan to assist them in meeting their professional goals. Along the way, students learn how to plan, develop, and implement basic networks, and information systems, as well as mobile and Internet applications. 

Introduction to Information Support and Services

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students prepare to succeed within information technology by helping them explore potential careers and develop essential customer service skills. Students apply their knowledge of hardware and software as they learn how to analyze technical support requests and perform customer service tasks while maintaining a safe work environment.

Introduction to Network Services

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

In this introductory course, learners study various network devices, physical media, network operating systems, and network security. This course also examines industry standards and the development of networking technologies, as well as software and hardware components used in typical networking and internetworking environments.

Network System and Design

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Learn how to identify the needs of both customers and businesses; students develop an understanding of network terminology and fundamentals. This course covers how to differentiate between various network classifications and practice the high-level design principles of network architecture.

New Applications

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course teaches the basics of Internet programming, web programming, and web hosting. In addition to learning standard terms and techniques, students gain practical experience as they develop simple video games and mobile applications. This online course also examines a typical workplace environment for web and distributed applications designers.

Music Appreciation VS

Prerequisite:  None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This one-semester elective for grades 9-12 provides instruction in basic musical elements, traces the development of classical music, and gives a lifelong appreciation of music. Complete with listening exercises, this course helps students to describe common instruments by sound, define musical measures, compare music time periods, and study the value of music to society throughout time.

Music Theory VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

With emphasis on the theory, this course lays the foundation for a lifetime appreciation of music and allows students to discover the basics of rhythm, timing, melody, and full composition. Through the use of audio and video clips, interactive lessons, and off-computer projects built into the course, students are exposed to a learning environment ideally suited to his learning style.

Office Applications 1

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Microsoft® Word®, PowerPoint®, & Publisher® 

This one-semester, five-unit CTE elective includes multimedia, tests, quizzes, and interactive lessons on the Microsoft Office programs of Word, PowerPoint, and Publisher. Internet-based lessons cover designing, developing, editing, and sharing business documents.

Office Applications 2

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Microsoft® Excel® & Access® This one-semester elective for grades 9-12 expands computer skills with a focus on spreadsheets and database -driven documents. This online CTE course includes five units that delve into data entry, formatting, formulas, and functions. Tests, quizzes, and interactive lessons with multimedia are included. 

Personal Financial Literacy VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

As the world becomes increasingly virtual, it is important that students understand the importance of financial responsibility and money management from a Christian perspective. This personal financial literacy course is a semester-long elective that prepares high school students to make thoughtful and effective financial decisions throughout their lives. Interactive, multimedia-rich lessons will help students learn how to assess financial information, explore career options from a monetary perspective, create a budget, and plan for the future. More than theoretical, this course offers Bible-based, practical advice and skills for living in today's world.

Physical Education (with Health)

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Ignitia Physical Education focuses on sports performance in soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. Students can participate in these sports at a scheduled class time and log activity with the goal of practicing daily healthy fitness habits. Technique, rules, and appropriate preparation are emphasized. This online course offers students the opportunity to apply what they learn online to off-computer activities.

Physical Fitness (Advanced Physical Education)

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

Lessons cover exercise, flexibility, cardiovascular health, weight control, goal-setting, and motivation, while requiring students to engage in physical activity and log their time and progress. The course units include text-based lessons, on and off-computer exercises, special projects, learning games, quizzes, and tests that appeal to today's digital generation and help teachers to evaluate progress and mastery of the materials. Physical fitness enriches the educational experience for Christian school students and sparks a passion for learning.

Small Business Entrepreneurship

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9,10,11,12

This one-semester CTE elective inspires future business owners by presenting an overview of the main aspects of business management. Topics include creation, development, and organization of a small business, as well as the challenges and benefits associated with being one's own boss. Course content includes interactive lessons, tests, quizzes, and multimedia

Software Development Tools

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

Students learn how applications are created in commonly used software development tools, discover how web applications communicate with web browsers to prevent errors, and learn various testing strategies to improve the quality of application software.

The Civil War VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course covers topics like the Confederate States and the Union, war figures like Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee, pivotal battles, and the Reconstruction Era.  It looks at the daily life of a Civil War soldier and interactive maps that show battles and troop movement.

Twentieth Century American History VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course provides comprehensive study of America’s dynamic century of change, conflict, and growth.  This multimedia-enriched course examines nation-shaping events like the industrial age, progressivism, equal rights, the roaring ‘20’s, the depression, the two World Wars, and the Cold War conflicts.  This course includes several hands-on history projects.

Vietnam Era VS

Prerequisite: None

Eligibility: 9, 10, 11, 12

This course examines the long, difficult conflict of the Vietnam War.  The course’s topics include the Vietnamese country and people, the United State’s involvement and military strategy, the role of the Cold War, the loss of civilian and soldier lives, the war’s influence and aftermath.